Equating Kanaloa and Kahoolawe

The kino of Kanaloa is restored. Forests and shrub lands of native plants and other biota clothe its slopes and valleys. Pristine ocean waters and healthy reef ecosystems are the foundation that supports and surrounds the island.

Na po'e Hawai'i care for the land in a manner which recognizes the island and ocean of Kanaloa as a living spiritual entity. Kanaloa is a pu'uhonua and wahi pana where Native Hawaiian cultural practices flourish.

The piko of Kanaloa is the crossroads of past and future generations from which the Native Hawaiian lifestyle spreads throughout the islands.

 This vision statement projects the vision for the long-term future condition of the environment and ecosystems of the Kaho'olawe Island Reserve, for the continuing involvement of the people of Hawai'i in caring for the island, and how Kaho'olawe can help in the spread of indigenous Hawaiian culture and its perpetuation to future generations.

The kino of Kanaloa is restored. Forests and shrublands of native plants and other biota clothe its slopes and valleys. Pristine ocean waters and healthy reef ecosystems are the foundation that supports and surrounds the island.

The first paragraph of the Vision Statement refers to the physical as well as spiritual restoration of Kanaloa (Kaho'olawe). Kanaloa is one of the major Hawaiian male gods. He is the god of the ocean (and all things related such as navigation), ocean animals, and fresh water found underground. The island of Kaho'olawe was named for the god Kanaloa and they are considered to be one and the same.

Accomplishing restoration and revegetation envisioned in this statement will be a long and arduous task. For the foreseeable future, much of the activities occurring on the island will revolve around restoration. Moreover, Kaho'olawe presents the people of Hawai'i with a unique and historic opportunity to revitalize the island with native plants and biota in an isolated setting and to create a marine sanctuary that can also help regenerate marine life for Maui and Lana'i.

Na po'e Hawai'i care for the land in a manner which recognizes the island and ocean of Kanaloa as a living spiritual entity. Kanaloa is a pu'uhonua and wahi pana where Native Hawaiian cultural practices flourish.

This second paragraph acknowledges the traditional role of Kaho'olawe as envisioned by Hawaiian ancestors; as a sacred form and refuge of the life force and energy of Kanaloa. Kaho'olawe is a cultural treasure for all the people of Hawai'i, especially na po'e Hawai'i (the Native Hawaiian people). There are few places left in today's Hawai'i where one can go to learn about being Hawaiian. Kaho'olawe offers such a place.

Restoring the island will provide a place and a purpose for a new generation of Hawaiians to be trained in both the rights and responsibilities of "kahu o ka 'aina" (stewards of the land). This involves learning to care for the natural resources, only taking what is needed, and observing a kapu to allow the resources to naturally regenerate from season to season and year to year.

The island will provide a place for Hawaiians and other kama'aina who see Hawai'i as their homeland to experience the intimate connection to the land, the sea, the kupuna (ancestors), and the akua (gods). Hawaiian arts and sciences related to traditional navigation, fishing, cultivation, etc. will be taught to new generations. Thus, Kaho'olawe will be a cultural learning center where traditional cultural and spiritual customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hawaiian people can take firm root and flourish.

  • The piko of Kanaloa is the crossroads of past and future generations from which the Native Hawaiian lifestyle spreads throughout the islands.
  • Traditionally, Kaho'olawe served as the navigational center or piko (center) and crossroads connecting Hawaiians to their ancestral homeland, Tahiti. The Kealaikahiki Channel aligns with the north-south Kane- Kanaloa line at the zenith of the heavens, dividing east from west. In aligning the stern of a voyaging canoe in the Kealaikahiki channel with Lae O Kealaikahiki on Kaho'olawe, Pu'u O Hoku on Moloka'i, and Hoku Pa'a (the North Star) a navigator can set a straight course for Tahiti.

    For contemporary Hawaiians, Kaho'olawe serves as the piko for the regeneration of Hawaiian spiritual, cultural and subsistence practices. As more and more people of Hawai'i are able to touch and be touched by the island and experience Hawaiian cultural practices, the Native Hawaiian lifestyle will spread throughout the islands. Again, the KIRC and State of Hawai'i have a unique and historic opportunity to enhance the recognition and perpetuation of the culture indigenous to the Hawaiian islands and existing nowhere else in the world.

     

    Ka 'Aina, Ke Kai A Me Ka Lewa

    In the Hawaiian context, uses of the land and ocean are interconnected and inseparable. In Hawaiian tradition, Papa gave birth to Kanaloa (the island which is now known as Kaho'olawe) which was called a "fish child for Papa:"

    Hanau kapu ke kuakoko
    Ka'ahea Papa ia Kanaloa he moku
    I hanau 'ia he punua he nai'a
    He keiki i'a na Papa I hanau,
    Ha'alele Papa ho'i I Tahiti.

    Born are the sacred pain
    Papa prostrated to Kanaloa an island
    He was born a fledgling a porpoise
    A fishchild for Papa was born
    Papa left, returned to Tahiti.

    Kanaloa as Kaho'olawe is both the island and its surrounding ocean. Changes on the island impact upon the surrounding ocean. This principle continues to be applied throughout this plan.

    The atmosphere above Kaho'olawe also impacts upon the landscape and has been considered in projecting planned uses for the island. The atmosphere, where clouds form for rain, is an integral link in the cycle of life giving water for the island. Ho'ailona or prophetic natural signs and omens appear in the atmosphere and serve to guide and validate Hawaiian customs and practices. Kaho'olawe is the only island which provides a superior vantage point to observe the ocean, winds, channels, currents, stars, sun, moon, and clouds for practices such as navigation, fishing, astronomy, and the keeping of the calendar. Protecting the airspace is integral to sustaining the integrity of the island reserve.

    REF: http://www.hawaii.gov/kirc/use/use.htm#2