----- Original Message -----
From: "Aaliikuhonua" <aaliikuhonua@aol.com>
Newsgroups: soc.culture.hawaii
Sent: Wednesday, January 31, 2001 4:50 AM
Subject: Re: heaius and kanaloa


>
> Actually, Loki is probably a localized fishing deity for that 
particular
area.
> He is unknown in other places.
> Ku'ula is the far more recognized deity for fishermen.
>
> Also, the generic term for fishing shrines throughout all the islands 
is
called
> "Ku'ula". Usually identified by a white coral platform.
>
> Ku'ula is also associated with one of the many forms of the Goddess 
Hina
> (usually as a wife or a sister). Ku'ula is but one of many forms of 
the
God
> Ku.
>
> Tradition has it that Ku'ula and Hina lived at Hamoa on Maui and 
created
the
> first walled fishpond. He was later deified and offerings were given 
to
the
> Ku'ula "shrines" before and after every fishing expedition.
>
> The Ku and Hina traditions go far beyond just the fishing traditions. 
It
> brings in the ever-important male/female, hard/soft, 
upright/reclining
type of
> dualism found throughout many traditions.
>
> Other forms of Ku and Hina are known as forest deities. The morning
belonging
> to Ku (rising sun) and the afternoon belonging to Hina. When picking
herbs or
> greenery in the morning, it is done with prayers to Ku and plucked 
with
the
> right hand. Hina is prayed to in the afternoon and greens are 
plucked
with the
> left hand.
>
> As far as the God Kanaloa, for some strange reason,
> that deity was never as prominent here in Hawai'i. Ku, Lono and Kane 
were
far
> more important religiously.
>
> In all other parts of Polynesia, Kanaloa is the primary deity - also 
known
as
> tanaroa, tangaroa, fangaroa (not sure about spelling).
>
> Oddly though, one of the old names of Kaho'olawe is Kanaloa.
>
> A'ali'i





> aaliikuhonua@aol.com (Aaliikuhonua) wrote:

> > Ku'ula is the far more recognized deity for fishermen.

> yes, that's the one I remember!


> >
> > Also, the generic term for fishing shrines throughout all the 
islands
> is called
> > "Ku'ula". Usually identified by a white coral platform.

> Oh, maybe that's why the name sounded familiar. Apparently there 
were
> a few on Moloka'i's eastern portion of the island.



> > The Ku and Hina traditions go far beyond just the fishing
> traditions. It
> > brings in the ever-important male/female, hard/soft,
> upright/reclining type of
> > dualism found throughout many traditions.

> Yup. Although I specifically remember Hina being mentioned as part 
of
> a diety being worshiped by fishermen.


> > As far as the God Kanaloa, for some strange reason,
> > that deity was never as prominent here in Hawai'i. Ku, Lono and 
Kane
> were far
> > more important religiously.
> >
> > In all other parts of Polynesia, Kanaloa is the primary deity - 
also
> known as
> > tanaroa, tangaroa, fangaroa (not sure about spelling).
> >

> I think in Rarotonga & possbily other parts of the Cook Islands they
> have a figure of Tangaroa.




> Sent via Deja.com
> http://www.deja.com/


----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Aaliikuhonua" <aaliikuhonua@aol.com>
Newsgroups: soc.culture.hawaii
Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2001 4:50 PM
Subject: Re: heaius and kanaloa



> << Yup. Although I specifically remember Hina being mentioned as 
part of
> a diety being worshiped by fishermen.
> >>


> Hina is "worshipped" only in the context of being the wife of Ku'ula
> who is the primary deity....since offshore/canoe/net fishing itself
> was done only by the men (women could gather opihi, pipipi, etc. from
> the shore).

> Again, the need for dualism...the female counterpart is important.

> There are dozens of Hina sub-deities....most of which are associated
> with female occupations.

> Same with Ku sub-deities. Most are associated with male occupations.

> On a side note,the general title for fisherman (lawai'a) is very
> loosely used today...to include anyone or anykind of fishing.

> The lawai'a and lehia (a master lawai'a) titles were not given freely
> in ancient times. Only those who were exceptionally skilled at
> catching/harvesting large amounts of fish to help sustain the entire
> community on a regular basis could be called lawai'a. They knew the
> seasonal movements of many large schools of fish, which currents to
> paddle on, which fishing method to use for individual species, etc.

> Lastly, getting back to ku'ula type "shrines", let me clear up a
> little bit about that. The purpose of the ku'ula is to help the
> fisherman attract fish through offering and prayer. It can be a
> single coral or stone...or a pile or platform of either material.

> Then there is the Ko'a, whose purpose is to help multiply (again
> through prayer and offerings) the amount of fish or even birds of a
> known area.

> The ko'a a is coral or rock circular platform found at the shoreline
> where schools of fish are known to travel to. Sometimes ko'a are
> placed by fishponds or streams.

> In many instances, the ko'a and ku'ula are blended into one area or
> structure.

>